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Sarah Horton

Disrupting class and consumption: everyday decoration, pattern and ornamentation in fine art practice

This practice-led research uses decoration as a critical tool to disrupt semantic conventions in domestic and institutional contexts. Drawing on theoretical perspectives of the everyday and class, the research proposes a cross-pollination of work place and home scenarios. Decorative motifs and typical materials or objects used to signify prestige and/or operational efficiency will be juxtaposed, interfered with and brought into collision. Decoration is understood as incorporating ornamentation, pattern and décor; it denotes a language rich in semiotic reference and is thus well-suited to the manipulation and interplay of meanings. Although the use of décor and furnishing in fine art practice is increasingly visible, corporate spaces such as offices remain under-explored; such contexts will enable key contributions to new knowledge with reference to class and consumption.

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Sarah Horton