In review: Luke Wright and Cobbler at the Norwich Arts Centre

In review: Luke Wright and Cobbler at the Norwich Arts Centre

Bethany and Aidan, first year BA (Hons) Acting students, attended a Luke Wright and Cobbler performance at Norwich Arts Centre in October and share their thoughts with us. 

Aidan: The performance by Luke Wright and Cobbler is best described in Luke’s own words- “poetry with a backing track”. The hour was occupied by Luke and Jim Cobbler performing poetry to a beat, almost like a song. I found the performance enjoyable, especially considering it isn’t my go-to form of entertainment. Poems such as My Sadness, and Leave me reflect Luke’s own life and his struggle with fatherhood and divorce, whereas others, namely, Tongue, and Back at the End Again, foreground wider issues including politics.

Bethany: The content was relatable for many audience members. Like Aidan, I found that there was a depth to the song, My Sadness, which made me think about how sadness is sometimes a familiar place to return to.

Luke Wright used the words ‘wear my sadness’ and described sadness to be ‘honest’. Sometimes it feels like an easy option not to escape a bad situation or to seek change.

Aidan: As Bethany mentioned, each poem had a depth and emotion to it and this created an interpretation.

I could go on about the technical aspects of lighting and the screen behind changing the lyrics to mean something else, but all I will say is go watch it yourself and create your own meanings to the show.

I highly recommend it; check out their two singles on Spotify if you want a taste of the music.

Bethany: As we attended the show pre-lockdown, going into the venue we were greeted with a friendly welcome and were instantly made aware of the rules and how to keep safe during the performance. Having sanitised our hands at the door, we were shown to our table with our masks on.

Aidan: At the table we removed our masks and ordered drinks. There was table service, which meant we had less reason to get up and come into close contact with other people. There was a one-way system for entering and exiting the building.

Bethany: It was a shame that people could not be close to each other anymore, however it was a great feeling to see a live performance and share the experience sat with people that were in my bubble.

I felt safe and excited to experience a performance. I love the feeling of anticipation when the house lights go down and the room becomes silent. There was a clear effort to keep everyone safe and distanced, and I think everyone in the room appreciated the catharsis of the theatre.