Facebook
Twitter
Google+
Image credits
 

Research Degree Supervisors

NUA believes that excellence is achieved by creating a community driven by curiosity, ambition and ingenuity, and that is what we engender.

Find out more about the staff currently supervising research at Norwich University of the Arts.

Hilary Carlisle

Professor Hilary Carlisle

As Dean of Arts and Design at NUA, Professor Carlisle is responsible for the development and academic health of the BA courses in the Faculty. She is a member of the University’s Strategic Management Group, playing a key role in advising on academic developments and future plans. She has overall responsibility for taught postgraduate courses in the University and supervises research students engaged in practice-led doctoral research. Professor Carlisle continues to be involved in design education and research and her own digital textile design practice. Find out more about Professor Hilary Carlisle.

portrait

Professor Julian Malins

Professor Malins’ research is concerned with the application of design thinking for innovation, which has resulted in contributions to a diverse range of research projects, including smart clothing for health and wellbeing, design for built heritage, and computer supported collaborative working. He is visually impaired, and this has given him a unique perspective on the world and has helped fuel his enthusiasm for research and finding solutions to challenging problems. He has published on a wide range of topics that include, design thinking for SMEs, computer supported design and collaborative practice, and research methods for art and design. Find out more about Professor Julian Malins.

Professor Lynda Morris

Professor Lynda Morris

Professor Morris is the Curator of EASTinternational the international open submission exhibition, which has been realised in collaboration with a series of eminent invited selectors since 1991. Her activities as a curator and a writer have been concerned with issues of perception, conceptual art, and resistance in art and politics. She was responsible for the first UK exhibitions of several now well-recognised artists including Agnes Martin (1974), Bernd & Hilla Becher (1974-75) and Gerhard Richter (1977). Professor Morris is a Principal Investigator for the major AHRC funded research project ‘Picasso; Peace and Freedom’ with Tate Liverpool, the Albertina (Vienna) and the Louisiana (Copenhagen). Find out more about Professor Lynda Morris.

Professor Suzie Hanna

Professor Suzie Hanna

Professor Hanna’s research includes practice-based collaborations with other artists to create animated films. She gives papers at international conferences and industry seminars and has worked as a series consultant for an international children’s animation series ‘Faisal and Friends’. Her recent short animated film ‘Proem’, based on the work of American poet Hart Crane, has already won two international film festival awards and has been screened in competition in UK, US, Canada, Australia, Germany, Belgium and Ireland. Her recent articles have been published in The Journal of Media Practice and The Journal of American Studies. Find out more about Professor Suzie Hanna.

Dr Alisa Miller

Dr Alisa Miller

Dr Miller’s research is concerned with how the violence associated with modern war is represented – through poetry, literature, newspapers and journals, photography, art, posters, etc. – and with the ways various audiences access and interpret it. Her doctoral work at Christ Church, Oxford focused on the poet Rupert Brooke, politics, propaganda and print cultures during the First World War; she is currently completing a monograph based on this and subsequent research into poet-solders. She is also preparing an article on Gladys Peto, who worked as an illustrator during the war, and is developing a larger project with the working title ‘Articulating the Hero: Bodies, Religion and the Iconography of War in Twentieth Century Europe’. Find out more about Dr Alisa Miller.

Dr Krzysztof Fijalkowski

Dr Krzysztof Fijalkowski

The principal focus of Dr Fijalkowski’s research is the visual, literary and intellectual culture of the mid-twentieth century avant-garde, above all the work and legacy of the international surrealist movement. Recent projects have focused on surrealism in Eastern Europe, surrealism’s contributions to the fields of photography, design and psychoanalysis, and the movement’s contemporary legacy and activity. His research activities have included academic writing, exhibitions, translations and visual practice. Find out more about Dr Krysztof Fijalkowski.

Dr Rob Hillier

Dr Rob Hillier

Dr Hillier has been a practicing designer and lecturer for 25 years. During that period he undertook doctoral research that resulted in the design of the Sylexiad range of fonts for adult dyslexic readers. The research employed a series of comparative typeface testing techniques concerning legibility and readability to establish data that informed the design of the fonts. ‘Sylexiad’ has been featured in the design magazines ‘Novum’ (May 2008) and ‘Étapes’ (July 2008) and a paper about the research has been peer-reviewed in ‘The Journal of Writing in Creative Practice’ (2008). Dr Hillier is currently working on developing a research project around the idea of ‘Design Practice as Palimpsest’. Find out more about Dr Rob Hillier.

Dr Nicolas Maffei

Dr Nicolas Maffei

Dr Maffei’s research focuses on modernism, consumption and gender in American design 1918-1939. He has published academic articles in Design Issues (MIT Press) and The Journal of Design History (Oxford University Press). He has contributed chapters to Art Deco (V&A Publications) and The Design and Manufacture of Popular Entertainment (Manchester University Press, forthcoming). Dr Maffei has appeared on the Channel Five television series ‘Art Deco’ and was a consultant for the V&A exhibition, Art Deco, 2003. He organised and chaired the Design History Society’s international conference, Sex Object: Desire and Design in a Gendered World, 2003. Find out more about Dr Nic Maffei.

Dr Catherine Baker

Dr Catherine Baker

Over the last three years Dr Baker has been developing ways to represent the understanding of drawing processes and particularly the active way we interact with visual material, focusing on the relations between vision and drawing as a phenomenological contemplation. She has been involved with a number of research projects with the Department for Experimental Psychology at the University of Bristol. In 2010 Dr Baker completed an Artist‐in‐Residence at CRICBristol, a cutting edge, clinical research facility supporting local, national, and international research. She has also been invited to be International Artist‐in‐Residence at the National Art School in Sydney, Australia and is a peer-reviewer for TRACEY, the International Drawing Research Journal, based at Loughborough University. Find out more about Dr Catherine Baker.

Neil Powell

Neil Powell

Neil Powell is the University Pro Vice-Chancellor (Academic) whose broad area of research is concerned with sculpture and the linguistic turn in art since the crisis in Modernism. As a senior academic and chief programmer for the University Gallery he works regularly with the Arts Council Collections and Hayward at Southbank in London. Powell was on the selection panel for the Hayward Open Curatorial 2014-15 and is closely involved in the organisation and delivery of the next British Art Show – BAS8 – a Hayward Touring Exhibition. Powell is currently writing 2 conference papers, one of which is entitled, ‘Dead and Disorderly: the artist out of time’, which looks at works by artists and writers whose oeuvre has confronted the unimaginable, unpalatable and fugitive spectre of death and its associated aesthetics. As part of this research Powell will expand on the public lecture delivered last year on the works of of Jake and Dinos Chapman, whilst making reference to the work of James Lee Byars and Dante’s ‘Nine Circles of Hell’.

In terms of studio work, Powell continues to produce sculptural objects using a varied range of materials and idioms, from objects through to printed matter. More visible collaborations over the past decade include work with Annely Juda Gallery, London on a show of Roger Ackling’s work, and the ‘Washi’ exhibition with Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Culture; other high profile projects include work with Professor Michael Corris and Art & Language, (‘The Artist Out of Work’, Museum of Modern Art, New York 2000). Powell has also worked with artists as diverse as Lawrence Weiner, Alfredo Jaar, and the late Ian Hamilton Finlay, whose works formed part of the successful exhibition ‘Spectre at the Feast’, curated by Powell in New York City. Find out more about Neil Powell.

Victoria Mitchell

Victoria Mitchell

Victoria’s work draws on anthropology, history, philosophy, biology and critical theory as a way of interrogating relationships between critical and material forms of textile. Examples frequently reference fine and applied arts and architecture, most recently in ‘Drawing Threads from Sight to Site’ (‘Textile: the Journal of Cloth and Culture‘, 2006). With Cathy Terry (Norfolk Museums and Archaeology Service) she developed the ‘Norwich Textiles Project’ www.norwichtextiles.org.uk, from which research on Norwich textiles has grown. Victoria is a co-investigator for ‘Beyond the Basket’, an AHRC ‘Beyond Text’ project, which investigates basketry as process and as cultural reflection. Find out more about Victoria Mitchell.

Tom Simmons, Suzie Hanna and Sally Bayley research

NUA Research Online

Visit NUA’s online research archive which provides public access to a digital snapshot of the research, enterprise and practice generated by research-active staff and postgraduate students.

academicstaffprofiles

Academic Staff Profiles

All academic staff at NUA are practising artists, designers, media makers and academics. Read their profiles to find out more about their research and practice.